The Science Of Fiction

JesseJamesAvatar-1There are far too many self instructional books declaring how a fiction novel should be written.  Fiction stories should never be bogged down by transparent formulas and mathematical boredom.  If someone requires a book to show them how to tell a story, then the person simply has no business telling them in the first place.  Certainly, there is a distinctive difference between telling a tale verbally and writing one, but the only person that can tell you how to write it is yourself.  If we eliminate the science and stick with the fiction, what stories would be told!

An editor will say that the novel would be better if you went in a different direction instead of the one that the story logically dictates because, like a greasy cheeseburger, it should be suitable for mass consumption.  This has never exactly happened to me, but it certainly has with many other authors.  Plain and simple, the manuscript is not a manuscript to you.  It’s a story.  One that you wish to share with the world.  It’s not a profit or checkout item or documents in a mundane office that need to be sorted through.  Alas, if someone wishes to be published, they must view their personal creations as a lump of cow to be chopped, processed, and shipped to countless departments until whatever the machine spews out at the end is a different creation altogether. That’s the nature of the business. John Steinbeck once said in a mock conversation with an editor, “Here’s my book, do you want to publish it or not?”

A writer MUST comprehend that his work IS the business, and it is the writer’s responsibility to treat it as such if he or she wishes to share their story with the world, regardless of what version it may become.  At least it would be out there and in the minds and hearts of the most important people  in the world…readers.

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