Long time no post

So, it’s been a while.  I know you think I’m slacking, Merrilee!  I’ve mainly been working, and attempting to keep up with my little two year old!  As far as the new book goes… I haven’t finished it yet.  In a way, I’m a little afraid of the work that has to be put into it after completion.  Not that I’m too prideful to make revisions and alterations to particular sections of the novel, trust me, that’s not it.  It’s understanding and coming to terms with the fact that my book, personally, will no longer be a story but a product.  Sigh.

I wonder, what are your thoughts??

About 98% of what we know is about 2% of the universe.  One of the most intriguing scientific problems right now is dark matter.  In Santa Barbara, an astrophysicist says that they are building a global network of telescopes to study supernovae, and to find extrasolar planets.  Being an author of science fiction, the possibilities never cease to astound me.  Sure, when compared to much of science, much of what is written could be considered implausable.  Director James Cameron says: “but you know science fiction is kind of the opposite of science.  In science you start with the facts and figure out the story, but in science fiction you start with the story and then fill in the science…”  I’m in the business of telling stories, and therefore not all of what I write can be considered scientifically possible.  However, being aware of discoveries generates a basis for telling an intriguing story, or developing and modifying the things in which science has already created.

Star Wars depicts ships exploding in balls of fire in space.  Fire needs oxygen.  But who cares?  What would a dramatic dog fight in the far reaches space be without cool explosions or laser blasts?  It simply adds something relevant to what we are familiar with on Earth.  Does it enhance the dramatic effect of a sequence, or hinder it?  The answer to that question may reside in the sales of the movie, being the fourth highest grossing film of all time.  Interstellar warfare certainly sells.  What are your thoughts on this?

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The importance of Publishing Credits

Considering that nobody exactly wanted to comment on my last post, I’ll just throw a new topic out here.  Are publishing credits vitally imperative to landing that contract?  I would assume that they would certainly help, but one would hope that a publisher or agent didn’t go by that information alone.  The content of your story, the quality of writing, and the fact that your novel is something new and fresh should be enough right?

You’d like to think that.  Most people submit queries that never even get looked at.  The infamous slush pile is larger than the agented one.  My perspective is that unless your credits include something outstanding, such as  “I wrote the script for the last two James Cameron films,” or “Hi, my name is Brian Herbert,” then it isn’t all that impressive.  There’s certainly no harm in putting what you can in there, right?  Magazines, newspapers, websites.  I’m sure that they would help, but they won’t be the determining factor.  What do you think?